If You Need Rental Income to Afford Your Second Home… Read This

The short-term rental market is changing. Every year brings more regulation, more license fees and taxes and political pressure for fewer short term units and more long-term worker housing.
Three forces are driving these changes:
First, towns and counties can’t raise enough sales and property tax revenue to fund operations so they are turning to other taxes and license fees to bring in revenue. Because tourism is the largest part of our economy, lodging is the logical source for new revenue.
Towns are going as far as to pursue online travel companies for taxes on bookings at their sites and tracking down bandit landlords on social media and Craigslist.
Second, because half of second homes are never rented, many neighbors who don’t rent don’t want short-term renters next door. Short termed properties tend to bring more traffic, parking and noise issues among other things. Many homeowner associations are limiting rentals to several weeks or more.
And third, there is a continuing perception that somehow short-term rentals are stealing housing from locals. Never mind that instead of making owners rich, short-term rentals can only help defray the cost of a second home and a long term tenant rules out occasional owner use. Also, properties that are affordable for locals to buy are generally not good prospects for short-term rental.
In addition, because so many absentee owners rent through VRBO and AirB&B, towns and associations are starting to require a local manager to monitor the property. This and licensing helps governments keep track of who’s renting and helps them collect the lodging taxes.
There will never be enough local housing and tourism will only continue to grow. If your property isn’t subject to these changes yet, it will be sooner or later.
Ask questions about these issues if you are a prospective buyer and if you are an owner, pay attention to the news.
And beware of managers who project astronomical income from renting your property short-term.
Our main short-term rental season is from Thanksgiving to April 15 in the best of years, 150 days or less when rents are the highest for the year.
Summer rentals bring half as much.
If you use a manager, you’ll pay a hefty commission out of your gross income.
If you use your place at all for Christmas, New Year’s, MLK week, Presidents week and all of March you will cut into your best revenue period.
If you are dependant upon rental income to do more than defray some of your costs, you may not be ready for a second home.

 

 

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